Brand Trust Matters… A Lot.

Two-thirds of adults in the US say that trust in a brand has a great deal (31%) or a lot (37%) of influence on their…

Two-thirds of adults in the US say that trust in a brand has a great deal (31%) or a lot (37%) of influence on their decision when making a big purchase, reports SurveyMonkey in recently-released research. Adults in the US aren’t alone in the importance they place on trust: a majority of respondents in the… Read More »

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Mobile’s Now Up to Almost Two-Thirds of US Digital Ad Spend

Online advertising revenues in the US reached $25.6 billion in the first half of 2018, with mobile accounting for 63% of the total, according to…

Online advertising revenues in the US reached $25.6 billion in the first half of 2018, with mobile accounting for 63% of the total, according to the latest revenue report from the IAB and PwC. This represents an overall increase of 23.1% year-over-year. Behind this headline number, there are some other trends worth noting. Here are… Read More »

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Google Owns the Three Most Popular Tools For Leading SaaS Businesses

Beating out the likes of Facebook, Amazon and Microsoft, Google tools are more prevalent in large, high-performing SaaS businesses. Their products, Google Tag Manager, Google…

Beating out the likes of Facebook, Amazon and Microsoft, Google tools are more prevalent in large, high-performing SaaS businesses. Their products, Google Tag Manager, Google Analytics and G Suite are the top 3 tools used by SaaS businesses, according to a study by Drift [PDF] of the 100 companies featured in the Forbes’s “Cloud 100”.… Read More »

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Milestone: Netflix Tops Live TV As The Destination For Viewers’ Favorite Shows

It’s the era of peak TV, and it looks like Netflix is winning the content wars over traditional TV. In its latest annual Conquering Content…

It’s the era of peak TV, and it looks like Netflix is winning the content wars over traditional TV. In its latest annual Conquering Content study [excerpt download page], Hub Entertainment Research finds that TV viewers are becoming pickier about the shows they try, and identify fewer shows as being among their favorites. But here’s… Read More »

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Smartphones Are Now Responsible For the Majority of Global Digital Video Plays

Smartphones reached a new milestone in this past quarter, declares Ooyala in its latest quarterly Global Video Index [download page]. For the first time in…

Smartphones reached a new milestone in this past quarter, declares Ooyala in its latest quarterly Global Video Index [download page]. For the first time in Q2 the devices exceeded a majority share of all digital video plays worldwide, hitting 52%, representing solid growth year-over-year (from 46% in Q2 2017) and well above the previous high… Read More »

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Almost Three-Quarters of Americans Over 55 Now Own A Smartphone

Older Americans are catching up in terms of smartphone penetration in the US, according to the latest annual mobile consumer survey from Deloitte [download page].…

Older Americans are catching up in terms of smartphone penetration in the US, according to the latest annual mobile consumer survey from Deloitte [download page]. Some 74% of adults over the age of 55 now own a smartphone (up from 67% last year), making them the fastest-growing group in terms of smartphone ownership. This figure… Read More »

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Mobile Devices Becoming the Most Important Shopping Tools for More US Consumers

Almost half of US adults (45%) agree that their mobile device is quickly becoming their most important shopping tool, marking a considerable jump from last…

Almost half of US adults (45%) agree that their mobile device is quickly becoming their most important shopping tool, marking a considerable jump from last year, when fewer than one-third (29%) felt that way. So finds GfK in its latest FutureBuy study [download page], which surveyed 1,000 adults in each of 35 countries. The prevailing… Read More »

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Holiday 2018 Data Hub [Updated]: Cyber Week Recap

With Thanksgiving weekend and Cyber Monday (mercifully?) behind us, shopping results are coming out from several sources. Although the precise figures differ from one source…

With Thanksgiving weekend and Cyber Monday (mercifully?) behind us, shopping results are coming out from several sources. Although the precise figures differ from one source to the next, it seems that yet again the key takeaways include a new record for e-commerce spending on Cyber Monday and more gains in mobile commerce. The following recap… Read More »

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E-Commerce Grows in the Fashion Industry

The global online fashion market is predicted to reach $765 billion by the year 2022, a projected increase of $281 billion, or 58%, from this…

The global online fashion market is predicted to reach $765 billion by the year 2022, a projected increase of $281 billion, or 58%, from this year. In fact, in 4 years, 36% of total fashion retail sales are expected to occur online, up from 27% this year, according to a recent forecast [report page] from… Read More »

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Dealing with administrative grief

Universities are big places, some of them have a lot of students to manage and complex timelines to administer. Most of the time, I hope,…

Universities are big places, some of them have a lot of students to manage and complex timelines to administer. Most of the time, I hope, the administration of your degree will be invisible to you, but, when things break down, you can find yourself in administrative limbo. This happened to  Jessica Ritchie, a PhD student at the TC Beirne School of Law at the University of Queensland. Jess sorted out her administrative difficulties, but reflects here on how it happened and what support you need when you find yourself lost in the administative systems. You can find Jessica is on Twitter as @j_ritchie13

One of the most difficult things I’ve had to deal with whilst working on my PhD is managing the expectations of my university. In the end, I realised we were working towards two different goals.

While we both wanted me to complete the PhD, our relationship was more complicated than that. My Graduate School and administration were much more concerned with me getting the PhD done in three years. They had no real understanding or appreciation of the complexities of life, and the interruptions that this can bring to study. Our goals sometimes conflicted. My goal was to finish my PhD, but also be a competitive job applicant at the same time as staying in good health.

Image by @rawpixel on Unsplash

During my candidature, I became quite ill and required emergency surgery, after an extended time of going in and out of hospital. I wasn’t aware that I was meant to advise my Graduate School of my situation. My focus was on managing my health while trying to write, not looking up the policies and procedures for the university.

Long story short, not telling the graduate school what happened to me lead to a lot of administrative grief. I wasn’t able to complete the paperwork for a milestone – that had already been completed – because the technical due date was past. This technicality lead to me having to give an additional presentation; taking time away from writing, causing a lot of anxiety, stress and wasted time in meetings.

Going through the process, I felt more like a piece of paper than a human – I was reduced to just my due dates for completed milestones. The Graduate School and administration didn’t care that I was managing my PhD, while also teaching, publishing, supervising students for the pro bono centre, participating in conferences and seminars, and completing an invited overseas visiting scholar position.

To be honest it really soured my feelings towards the university and wanting to be on campus. However, there were four things that helped me through the process:

(1) I have an amazing supervisory team. My primary supervisor could tell that the process was not equitable, that it was upsetting me and took over and dealt with the administrative problems for me.

(2) I have some really close fellow PhD friends that really supported me and also shared their negative experiences with the Graduate School;

(3) I had picked a topic that I was and continue to be passionate about; and

4) I tried as much as possible to continue to focus on my goals, as that is what is the most important things to me – to finish my PhD – but to also be employable, while managing my physical and psychological wellbeing.

Whilst it is easy to reflect on the experience now and not get upset, it does make me glad I have a supportive supervisory team (and friends). If you ever face a similar situation you will realise how important both things are.

When I was looking at starting my PhD I did a lot of research (transferable skills!) on who I wanted as supervisors. I looked at potential supervisor profiles to see who they had supervised previously. I spoke to some of these students and asked them about my potential supervisors’ pros and cons. Further I looked at potential supervisor’s publications, and whether they collaborated with other researchers and in particular early career researchers.

Finally, I considered how my supervisors would complement each other and how they could help me develop my skills. This made my decision to approach my current supervisors really easy. As a consequence, my primary supervisor was really incredible in helping me and being very generous with his time sorting the problems out (Shout out to Professor Simon Bronitt).

In the end, it all worked out but not without some interruption to my writing process. It did lead to a lot of money being spent at local cafes, as I chose to work there instead of my university for a while. The main thing as always is to keep writing and ignore everything else, as hard as that can be – and now more importantly let me order another coffee.

Thanks for sharing your story Jessica! Do you have a tale of adminstrative grief to share? How did you end up solving the problem? Love to hear about your experiences in the comments.

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